Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Ocular demodicosis as a potential cause of pediatric blepharoconjunctivitis.
Cornea. 2010 Dec; 29(12):1386-91.C

Abstract

PURPOSE

To report Demodex infestation in pediatric blepharoconjunctivitis.

METHODS

A retrospective review of 12 patients, with ages from 2.5-11 years, with chronic blepharoconjunctivitis who failed to respond to conventional treatments. Demodex was detected by lash sampling and microscopic examination. Patients were treated with 50% tea tree oil (TTO) eyelid scrubs or 5% TTO ointment eyelid massages for 4-6 weeks.

RESULTS

Demodex mites were found in all, but 1 case had cylindrical dandruff in the lashes. After 1 week of TTO treatment, all patients showed dramatic resolution of ocular irritation and inflammation while Demodex counts dropped. All corneal signs resolved within 2 weeks except for a residual anterior stromal scar in 1 eye. During a follow-up period of 8.3 ± 4.6 months, 1 patient showed recurrent inflammation, which was successfully managed by a second round of TTO treatment.

CONCLUSIONS

Demodicosis should be considered as a potential cause of pediatric refractory blepharoconjunctivitis. Eyelid scrubs or massage with TTO could be an effective treatment regimen in these cases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Ocular Surface Center, Miami, FL 33173, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

20847679

Citation

Liang, Lingyi, et al. "Ocular Demodicosis as a Potential Cause of Pediatric Blepharoconjunctivitis." Cornea, vol. 29, no. 12, 2010, pp. 1386-91.
Liang L, Safran S, Gao Y, et al. Ocular demodicosis as a potential cause of pediatric blepharoconjunctivitis. Cornea. 2010;29(12):1386-91.
Liang, L., Safran, S., Gao, Y., Sheha, H., Raju, V. K., & Tseng, S. C. (2010). Ocular demodicosis as a potential cause of pediatric blepharoconjunctivitis. Cornea, 29(12), 1386-91. https://doi.org/10.1097/ICO.0b013e3181e2eac5
Liang L, et al. Ocular Demodicosis as a Potential Cause of Pediatric Blepharoconjunctivitis. Cornea. 2010;29(12):1386-91. PubMed PMID: 20847679.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ocular demodicosis as a potential cause of pediatric blepharoconjunctivitis. AU - Liang,Lingyi, AU - Safran,Steve, AU - Gao,Yingying, AU - Sheha,Hosam, AU - Raju,V K, AU - Tseng,Scheffer C G, PY - 2010/9/18/entrez PY - 2010/9/18/pubmed PY - 2011/2/11/medline SP - 1386 EP - 91 JF - Cornea JO - Cornea VL - 29 IS - 12 N2 - PURPOSE: To report Demodex infestation in pediatric blepharoconjunctivitis. METHODS: A retrospective review of 12 patients, with ages from 2.5-11 years, with chronic blepharoconjunctivitis who failed to respond to conventional treatments. Demodex was detected by lash sampling and microscopic examination. Patients were treated with 50% tea tree oil (TTO) eyelid scrubs or 5% TTO ointment eyelid massages for 4-6 weeks. RESULTS: Demodex mites were found in all, but 1 case had cylindrical dandruff in the lashes. After 1 week of TTO treatment, all patients showed dramatic resolution of ocular irritation and inflammation while Demodex counts dropped. All corneal signs resolved within 2 weeks except for a residual anterior stromal scar in 1 eye. During a follow-up period of 8.3 ± 4.6 months, 1 patient showed recurrent inflammation, which was successfully managed by a second round of TTO treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Demodicosis should be considered as a potential cause of pediatric refractory blepharoconjunctivitis. Eyelid scrubs or massage with TTO could be an effective treatment regimen in these cases. SN - 1536-4798 UR - https://brain.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/20847679/Ocular_demodicosis_as_a_potential_cause_of_pediatric_blepharoconjunctivitis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/ICO.0b013e3181e2eac5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -